Research associates

 

 

Tendayi Achiume

Tendayi Achiume

Tendayi Achiume is Assistant Professor of Law at University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law. Her research and teaching interests lie in international human rights law, international refugee law, comparative immigration law, international criminal justice, and property.

Achiume earned her B.A. from Yale University and her J.D. from Yale Law School. While at law school, she also earned a Graduate Certificate in Development Studies from Yale. She served as Managing Editor of Submissions for the Yale Journal of International Law and was a recipient of the Fox International Fellowship, and the Howard M. Holtzmann Fellowship in International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution.

Achiume clerked for Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke and Justice Yvonne Mokgoro on the Constitutional Court of South Africa. Following her clerkships, she was awarded the Bernstein International Human Rights Fellowship to work for the Refugee and Migrant Rights Project unit at Lawyers for Human Rights in Johannesburg. Achiume also taught on the faculty of the International Human Rights Exchange Programme based at the University of the Witswatersrand. She then joined the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP as a litigation associate.

Her publications include “Syria and the Responsibility to Protect Refugees,” 100 Minnesota Law Review _, (forthcoming 2015), “Beyond Prejudice: Structural Xenophobic Discrimination Against Refugees," in 45(2) Georgetown Journal of International Law 323 (2014); and a co-authored piece, “Prison Conditions in South Africa and the Role of Public Interest Litigation Since 1994” in 27(1) South African Journal of Human Rights 183 (2011).

Email: achiume@law.ucla.edu


Barbara Bompani

Barbara Bompani

Dr. Bompani is a senior lecturer in African Development and Director of the Centre of African Studies at the School of Social and Political Science, the University of Edinburgh.

Dr Bompani’s work focuses on the intersection between religion, politics and development in Sub-Saharan Africa. For several years her research has investigated the relationship between religious organisations and their activities and socio-political action in post-apartheid South Africa. She also been involved in a research project looking at Christian churches in Kenya and their role in promoting biotechnology and development. Between 2009 and 2011 she worked on a research project that analysed the role of Faith-based Organisations in South Africa to support non-citizens during the xenophobic attacks in 2008 and in 2009 and the churches' critical voice towards State’s intervention. Since 2012 she has been involved in a research project that investigates the role of Pentecostal-charismatic churches (PCCs) in framing public and political discourses around morality, sexuality and public engagement in Uganda.

Amongst other publications, she is author of "Local religious organisations performing development: Refugees in the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg" in Journal of International Development, vol. 27, Issue 2, 2015; (with Terreni Brown S.) 'A “religious revolution”? Print media, sexuality and religious discourse in Uganda' in Journal of Eastern African Studies, vol. 9, issue 1, 2015; and (with Frahm Arp M.) Development and Politics from Below, Exploring Religious Spaces in the African State, Palgrave-MacMillan, London (2010).

Staff web profile at the University of Edinburgh: http://www.cas.ed.ac.uk/people/core_staff/bompani_b

Email: B.Bompani@ed.ac.uk

Twitter: @BarbaraBompani

Centre of African Studies website, the University of Edinburgh: www.cas.ed.ac.uk


LeConte Dill

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Dr. LeConté J. Dill is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center. Dr. Dill received her B.A. degree in Sociology from Spelman College, her MPH degree in Community Health Sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles, her DrPH degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and was a Health Policy Leadership Fellow in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine. Additionally, she has worked in academic, non-profit, and public agencies across the U.S. on issues related to health policy and advocacy, health education, program evaluation, youth organizing, and urban planning. Ever interdisciplinary,she has also studied poetry with Suheir Hammad, Ruth Forman, Cornelius Eady, and Roger Reeves, and has been a featured writer in the Los Angeles Magazine, Berkeley Poetry Review,and The Feminist Wire. Her community-engaged research and teaching interests are focused on addressing health and social inequities among adolescents in urban neighborhoods. As a qualitative researcher, Dr. Dill examines the relationship between adolescent development and processes of the built and social environment, such as migration, residential segregation, gentrification, foreclosures, and neighborhood and sexual violence. Her current work investigates how youth in distressed neighborhoods navigate through them safely.

For additional information see LeConte's blog or her profile for the Institute for Alternative Futures. 

Email: LeConte.Dill@downstate.edu 


Johanna Hanefeld

Johanna Hanefeld

Johanna Hanefeld is Lecturer in Health Systems Economics in the department of Global Health and Development and Director of the Anthropology, Politics and Policy Group at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Her work focuses on trade in health services, health systems, governance, and quantitative and qualitative policy analysis mainly in low- and middle-income countries. In partnership with the ACMS she is currently undertaking research, funded by the UK MRC, Wellcome Trust, ESRC and DFID, on patient mobility in South Africa. She is co-editor of the Edward Elgar Handbook on Medical Tourism and Patient Mobility, and a convenor of the social science technical working group of Health Systems' Global. Johanna also organises the module on Globalisation and Health at LSHTM, and the seminar series on ethics and human rights.

Email: Johanna.Hanefeld@lshtm.ac.uk


Anuj Kapilashrami

Anuj Kapilashrani Anuj Kapilashrami (PhD, Msc Sexual Reproductive Health Research, MA Sociology) is a Lecturer in Global Public Health, longstanding PHM member and Associate Director of Global Development Academy at the University of Edinburgh. She has an interdisciplinary background in sociology and public health with a specialisation in policy and systems research. She works at the intersections of health politics and development praxis, with particular interest in their interface with gender, human rights and development. Over the last seventeen years she has worked in academia and with various development actors and social movements in India and the UK in varying capacity.

Her research projects fall under two broad thematic areas-  1) Health policy and governance; specifically, equity and health systems implications of global health initiatives and role of private sector in attaining universal health goals; 2) Gender inequalities and social and structural determinants of health.

Full profile available at http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/south_asian_studies/anuj_kapilashrami


Susan V. Meyers

Susan V Meyers

Susan V. Meyers is an assistant professor of English at Seattle University, where she teaches fiction and composition. The recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship in 2007–8 and a number of awards for her writing and teaching, she is the author of articles about literacy and migration in a variety of academic journals and numerous works of short fiction and poetry. Her novel, Failing the Trapeze, and her field study, Del Otro Lado: Literacy and Migration Across the U.S.-Mexico Border, were both published in 2014. 

Email: susanvmeyers@gmail.com | Institutional Profile


EJ Milne

EJ Milne

EJ Milne is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University in the UK. Her research focuses on people in transition (including young people and those identifying as LGBTQI, migrants and refugees); the politics and ethics of research and methodological innovation (including arts based methods, community based research, critical participation, sensory and visual methods and their applied ethics). Her work seeks to further the development of more negotiated processes of knowledge production working not only in the interests of the academy, but also participants and their communities.

Her publications include ‘Visual activism and social justice: making young people’s lives visible across ‘public’ and ‘private’ spaces’, Current Sociology (with Sarah Wilson, forthcoming); ‘Critiquing participatory video: experiences from around the world’, AREA (forthcoming); ScotCen (2015) Wee favours, everyday help and support: the Glasgow Study. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation; and Milne, E-J. Mitchell, C. and de Lange, N. eds. (2012) The Handbook of Participatory Video. Lanham MD: AltaMira Press.

EJ is the UK co-representative on the Pool of European Youth Researchers (PEYR), an expert panel established by the European Commission and the Council of Europe to advise on European youth policy and research; and Vice President of the International Sociological Association Visual Sociology Group (WG03)

Work and Publications  | Email: ab8336@coventry.ac.uk

Further information about the Centre for Trust Peace and Social Relations


Francis Musoni

Francis Musoni

Francis Musoni is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, where he teaches undergraduate surveys of Sub-Saharan African history as well as Upper-level seminars on Migrations Within and Out of Africa; Africa’s Borderlands; and Global Migrations. He holds a B.A, M.A and Graduate Certificate in Education from the University of Zimbabwe, as well as a PhD from Emory University. His research focuses on migration, borderlands, informal sector economies and identity formation in Southern Africa. Musoni is the author of “Forced Resettlement, Ethnicity, and the (Un) Making of the Ndebele Identity in Buhera District, Zimbabwe,” which appeared in African Studies Review, 57, 3 (2014) and “Operation Murambatsvina and the Politics of Street Vendors in Zimbabwe,” published in the Journal of Southern African Studies (2010). He is currently writing a book on this history of “illegal” migration across the South Africa- Zimbabwe Border, from the 1890s to the present. Before joining the University of Kentucky, Musoni taught at the University of Zimbabwe and held a visiting fellowship at the Five Colleges African Studies Program in Amherst, Massachusetts. 

Email: fmu223@uky.edu 

UK-link 


Lorena Nunez

Lorena Nunez

Lorena is a social anthropologist with specialisation in Medical Anthropology. She obtained her Master degree in Development Studies at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague and her PhD from Leiden University, in The Netherlands. As an associate researcher to ACMS she collaborates in teaching, in research and supervision.  Her recent publications are on the linkages between migration and HIV/Aids and on issues of mental health and faith based healing. She has also researched and published on the topic of dying and death among cross border migrants. Lorena is currently conducting research on the sacralisation of urban space by migrants groups in south Johannesburg. This research is conducted in collaboration with the Religion and Migration Initiative at ACMS. She holds a lecturer position in the Department of Sociology, University of the Witwatersrand.

Email: Lorena.NunezCarrasco@wits.ac.za

Phone: +27 (0) 11 717 4427


Marlise Richter

Marlise Richter

Marlise completed a PhD in public health at the International Centre for Reproductive Health at the University of Ghent (Belgium) on sex worker access to health care services in South Africa and Kenya. She has worked as a researcher for Project Literacy, the AIDS Law Project and the Treatment Action Campaign. 

She currently holds the position of Policy Development and Advocacy Specialist at Sonke Gender Justice in Cape Town, and focuses on the decriminalisation of sex work, as well as prison reform. She is a visiting researcher at the School of Public Health & Family Medicine, University of Cape Town and at the African Centre for Migration & Society, Wits University, where she pursues her research and advocacy interests in feminism, human rights and HIV/AIDS, with a particular focus on sex work and gender based violence.

Email:  marlise.richter@gmail.com

Tel: +27 (0)82 858 9927

CV | Publications


Aurelia Segatti

Aurelia Segatti

Aurelia Segatti is a Research Associate at the African Centre for Migration & Society, Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg). She holds a PhD in Political Science and an MA in African Studies majoring (political science) from the Centre of African Studies (CEAN – Bordeaux) and is a former student of Science Po Bordeaux and ENS Cachan. Her PhD thesis was devoted to the transformation of South African immigration policy in the post-apartheid period. 

Her research interests are public policy, immigration policy analysis, regional policy coherence and local migration dynamics. Research Director of the French Institute in South Africa between 2004 and 2008, she was then appointed Senior Research Fellow with the Institute of Research for Development from 2008 to 2010 on a joint research programme looking at the governance of mobility in selected African cities based at the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa). She currently coordinates several international research programmes (ANR XenAfPol; ANR MItrans; Migrating for Work Research Consortium www.miworc.org.za), teaches and supervises at MA and PhD level. 

She has co-edited several books (with Loren B. Landau, Contemporary Migration to South Africa, World Bank; with Jocelyne Streiff-Fénart, The Challenge of the Threshold, Lexington), published in: Review of African Political Economy, Politique Africaine, Public Administration and Development, Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, Lusotopie, and is a reviewer for the following journals: Africa Today; African Studies; African Diaspora. Journal of Transnational Africa in a Global World; Critique Internationale; Ethnic and Racial Studies; Journal for Contemporary History; Journal of Modern African Studies; Spatial Justice Review; Foresight Global Environmental Migration Project (UK Government); Regions & Cohesion. She is currently working at the Public Affairs Research Institute.

Areas of supervision:  migration policy development; labour migration; xenophobic mobilisations; economic indigenisation & xenophobia 

CV | Publications


Marnie Shaffer

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Marnie holds an MSc in social anthropology (University of Edinburgh) and a PhD in anthropology (The Ohio State University) with specializations in gender and refugee studies. Her doctoral research focused on gender relations in Johannesburg’s Somali community. She recently worked on an ESRC funded research project examining the onward migration decisions of refugees who were dispersed across the UK as asylum seekers.  


Lothar Smith 

Lothar Smith

Dr Lothar Smith is assistant professor at the Department of Human Geography, Radboud University, The Netherlands; and a visiting researcher at ACMS/ He is coordinator of Glocal, an interdisciplinary research group of the faculty focusing on human mobility, development issues and conflicts, advisory board member to the African Studies Centre Leiden, and a steering group member of Transcode.

In research and education he takes a special interest in the globalisation-development nexus for the global south, notably where this concerns the migration of people. In this capacity he also coordinates the Human Geography master specialization ‘Globalization, Migration and Development’.

Projects in which Lothar Smith has been involved in the recent past and present are a NUFFIC (Dutch government) funded capacity building project to establish the Centre for Migration Studies in Ghana; a migration-climate change programme focusing on educational programme exchanges between the global north and south funded by the EU (Lean-CC); the New Indonesian Frontiers programme, which explores various dimensions of the economic-ecological encounter in the Kalimantan region of Borneo; Diverse, a programme focusing on tools helping to further the integration in the Dutch labour market of migrants; and TRANSCODE (www.transcodeprogramme.org), a programme taking a multi-stakeholder approach in developing sustainable approaches connecting foreign based migrants, through transnational ties, to local development in the global South.

Email: l.smith@fm.ru.nl


Maya Unnithan

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Maya Unnithan is Professor of Social and Medical Anthropology and Director of the Centre for Cultures of Reproduction, Technologies and Health (CORTH) at the University of Sussex. Maya received a Ph.D (1991) in Social Anthropology from Cambridge University and holds degrees in Sociology (MA) and Economics (BA Hons). She has taught at Sussex since 1991 and initiated postgraduate courses in Medical Anthropology in 2003. Her research interests include kinship and gender politics, childbirth, infertility, maternal health inequalities, sexual reproductive health rights, migration, reproductive technologies, sex selection, surrogacy and global health. She has thirty years of international, collaborative and field based research experience in India. Maya has recently completed an Economic and Social Science Research Council funded research project on civil society understandings of human rights as applied to sexual, maternal and reproductive health in India.

Maya is particularly interested in the intersections between mobilities, migration and global health, especially the social implications and cultural underpinnings of global flows of ideas and technologies of reproduction, health and rights. Her work in the area of migration began with field research in 2004 on the internal rural-urban migration of labour migrants in NW India, with a specific focus on women’s experiences of birth, reproductive health and the implications of movement for the health of their children. Maya has explored the role of emotion and meanings of place in migrant sexual and reproductive health. She is currently engaged in collaborative work on sex selective abortion amongst British Asians (UK) and on adolescent migrant reproductive health in India and South Africa.

Email: m.unnithan@sussex.ac.uk 

CORTH Sussex profile page 


Helen Walls

Helen Walls

Helen L. Walls, PhD, MPH(Hons) is a Research Fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health. She was formerly an NHMRC Sidney Sax Public Health Fellow with The Australian National University,and has worked with the World Health Organization and New Zealand Ministry of Health. Her research interests include food systems, nutrition and health, with a particular focus on trade and agricultural policy, and also trade in health services, medical tourism and migration. She is an associate editor of the journal BMC Obesity.

Email: Helen.Walls@lshtm.ac.uk 

Twitter: @helenwalls

LSHTM profile page | Publications