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Migrations of Knowledge

An international conference hosted by Carl Van Ossietzky University, Oldenburg

3-6 December, 2014

ACMS will be co-hosting the Migrations of Knowledge conference in Germany. The conference will address current conditions and modes of academic knowledge production. It will revisit the ethical, political and social visions of research and higher education articulated in the second half of the 20th century at European and African universities. Researchers will scrutinise the academic discourses on the geopolitics of knowledge, gender and ethnicity, critical dialogues between the social, cultural and engineering sciences as well as the differences of and interactions between epistemologies in the Global North and the Global South.

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The International Conference on Migration in Africa (ICMA)

hosted by the Scalabrini Institute for Human Mobility in Africa (SIHMA) and the Institute for Social Development at the University of the Western Cape, Cape Town

ACMS will be participating in the ICMA on 3 December 2014. Dr Roni Amit, Senior Researcher, will speak on 'The Limits of South Africa’s Migration Management Regime: Expanding ‘Illegality’ in Policy and Practice'.

The International Conference on Migration in Africa (ICMA) will bring together local, African and international scholars, academics, researchers, practitioners, professionals, policy makers and NGO representatives and funding bodies to discuss issues relating to human mobility in Africa, including south-south migration, the nexus between migration and development and irregular migration.

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The Making of Publics in Kinshasa

A special lecture hosted by the Graduate Centre, Department of Social Anthropology, African Centre for Migration & Society, and the Centre for Indian Studies in Africa presented by Prof Filip De Boeck

Monday 17 November, 2014

‘What sort of collective life and what sort of knowledge is to be gathered (...) once modernity has been thrown into doubt while the task of finding the ways to cohabit remains more important than ever?” (Latour 2005 Reassembling the Social. Pp. 16-17). Filip De Boeck’s presentation takes this question to Central Africa’s urban worlds. Based on recent ethnographic data from Kinshasa, the capital of DR Congo, this presentation will reflect upon the changing connotations of what constitutes the public sphere and the meaning of the categories of public and private, of ‘publics’ and of diversity in the urban locale.

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Migrancy and labour in the hospitality sector in South Africa

A presentation of MiWORC research findings

Tuesday 11 November, 2014

The MiWORC Team is pleased to invite you to attend its presentation of the key research findings in its draft report on the political economy of low skilled foreign labour in the hospitality sector. Based on interviews with 54 respondents, a detailed policy analysis and summary of available data on the sector, the report identifies key trends and dynamics within the structure of the sector and its relation to migrant labour, and highlights where there are knowledge or policy gaps regarding the sector. This presentation will provide an opportunity for the research team to incorporate comments and inputs from the public, civil servants and key stakeholders before finalisation and dissemination.

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Social security and social protection of labour migrants in South Africa and SADC

A presentation of MiWORC research findings

Thursday 6 November, 2014 

The MiWORC Team is pleased to invite you to attend its presentation of the key research findings in its draft report on its work in work package 4: the portability of social rights. The fieldwork and analysis conducted explored the social benefits available to, and accessed by, foreign workers in South Africa within the context of regional integration. The research findings examine whether portable social benefits for migrants could provide better mechanisms for social protection. This presentation will provide an opportunity for the research team to incorporate comments and inputs from the public, civil servants and key stakeholders before finalisation and dissemination.

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Weak State/Tough Territory: The Social Sources of Immigration Control in South Africa

A Lunchtime Seminar to be presented by Prof Darshan Vigneswaran (University of Amsterdam)

Tuesday 11 November, 2014

Our leaders can’t agree on the measures needed to avoid an environmental apocalypse, or how to control the spread of nuclear weapons, or when to take action against genocidal regimes. However, they do tend to agree about one thing: territory (Elden 2013, Ruggie 1993, Sassen 2006). Nations can decide who arrives on their soil and determine who must leave. Territory is a rare point of consensus in a political system that is otherwise characterized by disunity and discord. What makes territory such a tough norm? Sovereign rulers came up with the idea, because it was in their interests to distribute turf amongst themselves (Krasner 1999, Tilly 1985). However, this paper argues that ‘anarchical societies’ may more powerfully determine whether the norm endures (Bull 1977, Wendt 1999). In the absence of commands from above, fractious groups of non-sovereign actors – including multilateral organizations, bureaucratic cliques and vigilante mobs – may combine to defend national borders. As a result, territory can be surprisingly strong even when rulers are not.

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Doing the dirty work? Foreign migrant labour and domestic work in South Africa

A presentation of MiWORC research findings

Tuesday 4 November, 2014 

The MiWORC Team is pleased to invite you to attend its presentation of the key research findings in its draft report on migrant domestic workers. Based on more than 40 in-depth interviews with workers, employers and unions, the report reveals a host of challenges that point to a gap between policy and practice for both local and foreign-born domestic workers. This presentation will provide an opportunity for the research team to incorporate comments and inputs from the public, civil servants and key stakeholders before finalisation and dissemination.

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Jo Vearey quoted in IRIN Africa

South Africa's health system shuns asylum seekers

31 October, 2014


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ACMS research mentioned in Ground Up Magazine

Peeing into a plastic bottle on the long road from Lindela

27 October, 2014

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“Migration is a Really Big Problem Here”: Literacy on the Move in the Transnational U.S.-Mexico Context

A Lunchtime Seminar to be presented by Prof Susan V. Meyers (Seattle University)

Thursday 30 October, 2014

The history of U.S.-Mexico relations is strongly characterized by migration patterns between the two nations—and resulting policy decisions. These decisions influence and are influenced by a wide range of factors, including education. For instance, an initiative called the DREAM Act would allow undocumented youth who have grown up in the United States to pursue a college education and employment. However, the DREAM Act has spent more than a decade in Congress and has never been fully accepted. This impasse suggests a deep anxiety on the part of U.S. educators and policy makers with respect to the rising numbers of Mexican-origin students in the United States. In many cases, educators may feel particularly frustrated by the difference between their priorities and that of their students.

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